• Rome Prize Nomination

    I've been nominated to apply for the Rome Prize at the American Academy in Rome.

  • Rema Hort Mann Award Nomination

    I've been recently nominated for the prestigious Rema Hort Mann Award here in New York City! This $10,000 award is given out annual to select group of artists in New York City.

    http://www.remahortmannfoundation.org/

  • Yale MFA Painting & Printmaking Exhibition at Garis & Hahn Gallery Review in Wall Street Journal

    Wall Street Journal, Greater New York Section, "Yale, RISD MFAs Go on Display", http://www.wsj.com/articles/yale-risd-mfas-go-on-display-1437173341
    July 18, 2015

  • Press

    Check me out as an Artist to Watch in the Spring 2015 Issue of The International African American Art Review!

    I am also a guest critic in this season's issue for a review of Yale University's 1st All-Black Art Exhibition "13 Artists". The article is titled "Refracted Discourse"

  • Graduation

    Graduating from Yale University with flying colors!
    Awarded the Barry Cohen Award, twice.
    Awarded the Ely Harwood Schless Memorial Fund Award for Excellence in Painting (Yale Painting Dept's Legendary Award)!

  • Grad Study

    I have been accepted to & will be attending Yale University School of Art starting fall 2013.

  • ain’t pressed
    Reginald Ingraham Gallery, Los Angeles, CA -- November 1 – December 20
    Two Person Show

    In his latest body of work Brandon Coley Cox uses the “PAID” stamp as a mark-making tool to create photorealistic drawings with reference to the control of the Black body. This fully
    embodies the ultimate purpose and symbol of the mark itself: capitalism. The white paper serves as both light and context, and critically addresses white supremacy of western
    contemporary culture.

    Duron Jackson’s works on paper are an ongoing examination, and intended as a declaration of being. Each painting is a life-sized impression, taken directly from the male figure, creating a unique mark or symbol, which catalogues and indexes the body, yielding a trace (evidence), figurative language, narrating a way of being; producing a vocabulary conveyed through acts that strip popular ideas of blackness and convey its essence.

    The symbiotic relationship between image & ground perpetuate an ongoing dialogue where both artists deal with the black body as a container of specific pathologies that are perpetually
    growing and feeding off those afflictions.

  • Baltimore Contemporary Print Fair w/David Krut Projects-New York

    @ Baltimore Museum of Art
    April 28-29th, 2012

    For one weekend every two years, more than 20 presses, printers, and dealers convene in Baltimore for this exciting two-day event.

    Spend an afternoon in the company of remarkable prints and people, browsing or buying limited editions, drawings, multi-part portfolios, single prints, and photographs.

    The Baltimore Contemporary Print Fair has inspired a number of print-related events and exhibitions.

    http://www.artbma.org/printfair/

  • EDITIONS | ARTISTS' BOOK FAIR
    with DAVID KRUT PROJECTS, NEW YORK

    The EAB Fair has grown in size and stature to become the premier showcase for contemporary publishers and dealers, presenting the latest and greatest in prints, multiples and artists' books. The Editions|Artists' Book Fair is well known for its vibrant energy and innovation, thanks to over sixty exhibitors, presenting hundreds of artists representing New York, Johannesburg, Amsterdam, London, Paris and points in between.

    www.eabfair.com

  • P A I D
    A SOLO EXHIBITION
    OF NEW WORKS BY
    BRANDON COLEY COX
    @ The University of the Arts - Philadelphia, PA
    October 10-27, 2011

    The word paid is American slang, stemming from hip-hop, for success through money-making. Getting paid and staying paid tend to be essential ingredients of success in terms of Black manhood. Not too long ago in history, however, Blacks in America were being paid for as slaves. Cox references this irony through the use of an accountants PAID stamp. Imagine .. one mark for every sold slave and their kin. Society has changed due to the struggles carried out by generations of Blacks determined to succeed in a country where the foundations are set against them.

    Cox captures and questions this sense of progress and all of its possibilities. By realistically drawing popular notions of Black success and elements around it with just the stamp, he poses many questions to the viewer. How many generations did it take to shape this possibility? When is the image complete? Why?

    As apart of an ongoing effort to contemplate the validity of popular imagery of Black men through a metaphorical means of creation, Cox presents a new animation. Years ago, he began taking photographs of young Black men, corrupting (damaging) the image several hundred times via computer soft- ware, and collaging them back together to make one digital print. In this animation, Cox has taken 3,488 of these collages and presents them all in an ongoing 2-minute loop.

    Cox is also presenting for the first time in Philadelphia, what he calls, masocuts. The prints begin as photographs with models in the studio. He then combines these with scanned drawings and cuts the image into a piece of masonite with both his hand and a laser. When inked as relief prints, the resulting images contain photographic, vector, and handwork with soft brown tones. These more intimate prints reflect on ges- ture & position as a means of power.